Love founder, singer, songwriter, Arthur Lee
Singer ~ Songwriter
Love
birth name: Arthur Porter Taylor

Arthur Lee

March 7, 1945, Memphis, TN ~ August 3, 2006, Memphis, TN

Arthur Lee, ostensibly Love's leader, referred to himself as “the first so-called black hippie, maybe the first hippie” but he was a difficult man to work with and the multi-racial group never managed to capitalise on their early reputation as the ultimate garage-folk-rock band. Lee subsequently led several incarnations of Love, issued a few solo albums and toured Europe backed by the Liverpool group Shack in 1992. However, he experienced drug and mental health problems and eventually spent five and a half years in jail on firearm offences as a result of California's “three strikes and you're out” policy. ~ the Independent: Arthur Lee Obituary ~ August 5, 2006 © The Independent

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August 3, 2014 ~ UK Top 100 ~ #3 (-) Zhu, Faded ~ #2 (1) Cheryl Cole featuring Tinie Tempah, Crazy Stupid Love ~ #1 (2) Magic, Rude

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Prior to forming Love, Arthur Lee was a Los Angeles hustler, desperately searching for the formula that would make him a star. In the early mid-'60s, Lee recorded some unsuccessful singles including one as the American Four on Selma, a subsidiary of Del-Fi, Luci Baines. He also recorded a session for Rosa Lee Brooks that featured Jimi Hendrix as a session guitarist. Lee found his niche at last when he founded one of the '60s seminal garage/folk/psychedelic bands, Love, in 1965. The band, which also featured fellow songwriter and singer Bryan MacLean, recorded three amazing albums for Elektra including Forever Changes, an album that is certainly a contender for best rock album ever made. ~ Allmusic: Arthur Lee ~ retrieved March 4, 2014 © Allmusic

Love

Love's first album was hailed by critics as a classic in the new folk-rock style and sold 150,000 copies. Its 1966 single My Little Red Book (penned by Burt Bacharach and Hal David) was a minor hit. The band's second album, Da Capo, featured some topically druggy lyrics, jazz touches, and a few personnel changes. The album was another groundbreaker, featuring one of the first side-long cuts in rock, the 20-minute-long Revelation The album also included the Top 40 hit 7 And 7 Is. Forever Changes, however, is considered by many to be Love's best, its answer to Sgt. Pepper, with orchestral touches, including horn and string arrangements, and a psychedelic feel that influenced many of the early-'80s neopsychedelic British bands such as the Monochrome Set, the Teardrop Explodes, and Echo and the Bunnymen. ~ Rolling Stone: Love ~ retrieved July 27, 2013 © Rolling Stone

Love ~ Alone Again Or (MacLean) ~ Ranked #141 NME 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time in 2014 ~ A haunting lesson in psych folk that echoes through the ages, few songs can marry the despair of a moment with a hope for the future so poetically. ~ 2014 © NME



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